3/11/2009

Save the sound of spring.



As I switched on the radio this morning I heard more gloomy news about our loosing battle with climate change and preserving the planet. My usual response to such reports is to sink into a deep melancholy but instead I decided to do something positive about one environmental issue that has concerned me for some time, and that is the plight of our bumblebees, so today I joined the Bumblebee Conservation Trust and I would urge you to do the same.

I am sure that by now we are all aware of the importance of bees, not only as pollinators of our wild plants and garden plants but as pollinators of many important food crops. If you care nothing about our countryside (and I am sure you do) then consider these words by Albert Einstein “If the bee disappeared off the surface of the globe, then man would only have four years left to live.''

The trust works in many ways, by raising awareness about the important role we can all make to help our native bees. I know that many of my dear fellow bloggers are keen gardeners so maybe you would like to help by planting more bee friendly plants this year? If we all planted just one extra species this year in our gardens I am sure it would be beneficial. If you are a lazy gardener like me you might want to try white dead nettle – so called because it has no sting! It looks very pretty with its white flowers and variegated leaves and provides good ground cover which helps prevent weeds.

The website has a wealth of fascinating information for gardeners, here is a little taster-

“Exotic or highly cultivated garden flowers are largely unsuitable, as they either produce little pollen and nectar, or keep it hidden away from the bees. In particular, most annual bedding plants (e.g. Pelargonium, Begonia, Busy Lizzies) have little nectar to offer bees or other wildlife. Instead, why not try growing traditional cottage garden flowers and native wildflowers. Many of these thrive and look superb in the garden. They are also easy to grow, generally being hardy and much more resistant to slugs and disease.”

So, instead of feeling depressed about the state of the world, perhaps you might also like to give the trust your support by doing a link on your blog? The more we help bees the more work the bees can do to help preserve our native plants which support many other life forms including our own. Please feel free to use my bee graphic on your blog to help the cause of bees worldwide.

18 comments:

  1. Great idea.
    Done.
    http://wonderfulroses.blogspot.com/

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  2. Bumblebees are definitely on the decline - maybe we need a really good summer to up their numbers.

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  3. I've seen a couple of news reports recently about this subject and like you have felt concerned about it. We have things like buddleia, sedum and lavender in our garden and the bees love those. I think this would be a great early birthday present for my husband as he loves bees and did bee keeping for a while at school years ago - thanks for the link:)

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  4. Valerie, this is wonderful... both the art and your positive action!

    I have a friend who has become a beekeeper in response to the declining bee population. He enjoys the hobby... and we greatly enjoy the delicious unprocessed honey we buy from him. Yum! Once you're hooked on home raised honey you'll never want to go back to commercial again!

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  5. Lovely painting.
    I think it's a great idea Valerie.
    My sister worked on a campaign for the honey association.
    You can find some lovely honey recipies here www.honeyassociation.com

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  6. It's amazing the effect bees have on the whole eco system. A very worthy cause, indeed.

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  7. The prospect of losing our bees is scary indeed. We have lots of beehives on our allotments, and it is wonderful that the majority of allotmenteers try to keep their plots bee friendly.
    It has been a day for bees - I just finished painting some, and then we had an enormous hairy 'humble bumble' which came in through the back door, and now your post about bees!

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  8. Oh Love your Bee!!!
    I'm glad you are bringing attention to the beautiful Bee.. I kept bees back in the 80's and they were in trouble back then.. they need all the help they can get directed towards them...

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  9. Sorry that I have no garden (not even the possibility of a window box) but I will surely pass these plant suggestions on to friends who do have real gardens.

    I was aware of the decreasing number of bees, but did not know that certain plants do encourage them.

    Many thanks! xo

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  10. Wonderful...Thank you...Me and Mr Bee love Bees...and we do have lots and lots in the summer thank goodness for that..Wise words from Mr Einstein!

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  11. What a beautiful painting! Thank so much for the link. We always have so many bees here, and wish for the sake of the planet that were the norm.... They like our flowering crabapple tree, and my herb garden. I'm trying to plant more bee friendly plants and flowers here too (but further away from the house, lol!)

    ~ Carolee

    ~ Carolee

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  12. For several years straight, my across the road neighbor kept honeybees. My flower gardens were never so lovely as during those years.

    It is rather like the canary in the cold mine, I think. It always amazes me when people, and governments, take the position of apathy when it comes to endangered species. Such arrogance to underestimate the world's design.

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  13. A few years back I planted an oregano plant in my garden and it has become abit of a nuisance seeding and spreading everywhere. A couple of years ago I was so tempted to remove the lot, until i noticed how the bees love it. I changed my mind and have left it all and decided to let my garden go semi wild. Solely for the purpose of encouraging insects.
    I did notice that there was definitely fewer bees here last year :(

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  14. I knew you would all share my concerns about our bees, both the bumble bee and the honey bees that need our help.

    Rosie suggests lavender, buddleia and sedum and Karen tells of oregano whilst Carollee has a crabapple in her garden which attracts the bees. Thanks for your suggestions, I don't have oregano so I might try that.

    Kayla coo, Teresa Pamela and Gwen all know beekeepers or have kept bees which is lovely to know and thanks for the honey links. I have tasted wild Staffordshire honey which is delicious and full of healing properties.

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  15. Brava Valerie...I shall put a link on my blog right now. I too have grave concerns about our little bumble bee friends, I will use your lovely image as a picture link as you so graciously suggest,
    Love, Patricia xx

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  16. This painting is gorgeous, the bee looks so real, beautiful painting :)

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  17. Hi, I,m cottonreel, I had lots of small bees on my grape hyacinths on Sunday. I,m hoping they were honey bees

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  18. I,planted a crab apple last week. It was only 43 inches high but looks healthy , cottonreel

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