8/07/2009

In search of bees.



Much has changed at The Natural History Museum since our last visit, although thankfully the building itself remains unchanged. Outside it is all Victorian splendour, a fantastically ornate building designed by Alfred Waterhouse. Inside the building the space has been divided into zones and on a hot and crowded school holiday I found the experience rather claustrophobic. I had hoped to look at bumblebees and felt sure that I would be able to find a display of the various British varieties native to our countryside. Maybe such a thing exists but I could not find it in the newly formed zonal exhibition areas.



All was not lost however as we found a wonderful green oasis in the wildlife garden, complete with many species of wild flowers, trees, insects and a beautiful pond filled with water lilies, moorhens and dragonflies, oh yes and bees! Real live bumblebees feeding on teasels, definitely worth a visit. Sadly my attempt at photographing the bees failed so I have not included them in the post.



Whilst I am on the subject of bees, you can read about the work that the Bumblebee Conservation Trust is doing by visiting this blog. Nikki is in charge of a project, which is trying to reintroduce the “Short –haired” bumblebee back into Britain.

24 comments:

  1. What a shame you didn't get to see the bees, but the garden right in the heart of South Ken looks a delight!

    I feel very protective of the bees that use our garden and try to grow lots of the plants they love.

    Celia

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  2. I was trying to photograph a bumble bee yesterday as it flit from flower to flower. It was just too efficient - never pausing very long on one before flitting off to another. The result was that most of my shots have a slight blur. Oh well.

    Hope you are consoled by your lovely shot of the dragonfly!

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  3. we do need bees!
    I just addid a post about bees

    when you like to read?
    http://averyfairygarden.blogspot.com/

    Gr. Anna

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  4. hello acornmoon, look at that building. what a spectacular collage!! i know a beekeeper and so i hear of the terrible time bees are having around the world. it's a lot like the frogs and toads - they are the canaries in the mine for the environment. the dragonfly image is really beautiful. have a peaceful day. steven

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  5. Hi there,

    the dragonfly you have captured looks like a metal brooch, it is so pretty...

    the gardens are inviting...

    Happy days

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  6. Goodness, that little oasis really is beautiful. A haven in the city. Glad the real live bees came out to play, even if the exhibition ones were elusive.

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  7. I think all the British short haired bumble bees have landed in my garden this year!

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  8. Hi Valerie!

    Thoroughly enjoyed your post.... especially now that I have a faster internet connection and it doesn't take forever for a page with photos to load! The Natural History Museum truly is an impressive building... such splendid old architecture is something I've always missed about England.

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  9. We have been having problems here in the US with bees. They are dying. When my kids were growing up they were everywhere and my Daughter was scared to death of them. Now you don't see many at all.

    I do agree, we need bees.

    Willow

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  10. Edward and I were strolling in our nearby park the other and I became aware of a humming nearby. There was a fat row of yellow and orange lantana that seemed to be blowing about in the wind, until I looked closer and noticed it was buzzing with bees! I was thrilled, as they seem to be having a difficult time of it lately!

    Lovely photos, as always! Wishing you a happy weekend!

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  11. Why didn't we go the Natural History Museum when we were over in 07! Another reason to come back.
    Beautiful dragonfly photo, art nouveau come to life.
    Bless the bees, they have given me another nice crop of pears this summer.

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  12. Oh, isn't the exterior of that building wonderful (I've often stayed withing walking distance of the Natural History Museum and have always loved it.) Sorry to hear that the inside is a bit choppy now.

    Your green photos are lushly beautiful. On to bees. This past week, when I was taking that walk on the elevated walkway, I saw lots and lots of bees, buzzing around the rather wild plantings. It was great to see and hear them.

    Best wishes!

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  13. what a lovely looking garden... shame you didn't see the bees.... we've seen a lot of bees this summer in and around Edinburgh, several different species of bumblebees, nice to see...

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  14. This year I have grown teasels from seed (well I planted them 2 years ago as they are biannual I think. They are smothered in bees gorging themselves. I also put a lavender in a pot outside the open greenhouse door and the tomatoes have pollinated better than ever before because the bees go in there to have a smooch! xx You wouldn't believe bees to be scarce here at all this year. xx

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  15. Congratulations Valerie, you have won my giveaway!! will send you an email.
    all the best
    Joy

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  16. It seems like everyone has seen lots of bees this year which is very reassuring. Our lavender plant has been covered in them also. It is hard to believe that they need our help as so many of the rare species are on the brink of extinction and all over habitats are disappearing.

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  17. Good Day Valerie, What a super beautiful grand Museum. Nothing like that here in the states. I enjoyed looking at the pond and all the water lilies. Very pretty. I am off this Thursday to a fiber festival and taking an all day class. A nice treat. Take care Hugs Judy

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  18. Surprised the NHM didn't have any bees to display. I am always happy to see bees on our flowers and we try to grow varieties they like particularly. It is so very worrying about the problems they face. They are such a very important and beautiful part of our countryside and ultimately our lives. There are so many threats around to insects, birds and the countryside in general these days. I was thrilled the other night to see a hedgehog in the garden as they seem to be in trouble too.

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  19. I haven't been to the Natural History Museum for several years and hadn't realised it had changed inside.


    For me, the building is as important a part of the visit as are the exhibits and the sense of height and space and air are part of it.

    Lucy

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  20. I love the Natural History Museum - great photos. We, too, have had loads of bees especially on the nasturtiums, lavender and buddleia:)

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  21. Fantastic garden ...Last photo is fascinating..Great..Unseen Rajasthan

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  22. It seems bees are quite scarce in my part of the world too. Have a lovely weekend Valerie!

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  23. It's too long since I was at The Natural History Museum. Thanks for reminding me of that - and for warning me of the changes.

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  24. I adore bumble bees. They are so good natured and, well, bumbling. They often find their way into my garden. Two varieties--the more familiar black and yellow fuzzies, and more recently I've seen the brown and yellow fuzzies.

    They are such a delightful little insect. Thank you for sharing your photos and story!

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