5/31/2010

In and out of the garden.



It has been a busy time here, family visits from afar being the main focus of our bank holiday weekend, so not much time for work or updates. We have had some sunny days and a little rain and everything in the garden is growing at an alarming pace, weeds included. Some plants seem happy to be left to their own devices and are therefore more than welcome, one such resident is what I call “London Pride”, a small, rather old-fashioned little plant with rosettes of glossy leaves which has established itself around the base of an old chimney pot in my tiny front garden. The lovely thing about it, apart from its very pretty little flowers, is the fact that it is very hardy and makes good ground cover. The clusters can be easily separated and planted in new areas or given way to gardening friends. (I think that is how I came by mine!)

Now, if you will forgive me I will get back to tidying away the toys, I am so glad I hung onto this box of treasures, which have provided many happy and constructive hours of fun for my children and now are being enjoyed by the next generation. "Billy and his Barrels" are still more or less intact but are missing the smallest barrel containing Billy, the culprit is pictured below.

14 comments:

  1. Not Ted! He could never be considered a "culprit", could he?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I like the pale foxgloves getting ready to flower in the background.

    They're starting to bloom in the wild here in Cornwall and were evident along the coastal path from Kennack Sands to Cadgwith Cove yesterday, as were clumps of red campions. Lesley

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh it is so much fun to bring out the tried and true toys that survived one childhood for a second generation to enjoy. What other treasures have you stashed away?
    London Pride will not grow in this part of Canada, I have tried with seed and a kind friend once brought some roots from
    England but they wouldn't transplant and take root.... just like me I suppose.

    However, as we are close to the anniversary of D Day may I remind you of Noel Coward's song that was so popular in those far off wartime days.

    "London Pride has been handed down to us/London Pride is a flower thats free.
    London Pride means our own dear town to us/ And our pride it forever will be."

    Incidentally, lupins grow wild
    on the east coast of Canada, abundantly and multicoloured along the roadside and paths, but they won't transplant to my Ontario garden.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Surely not Ted!;) We have London Pride and it is wonderful for ground cover and just grows merrily without any help from us. I too see it as an 'old fashioned' plant - I remember it growing in my grandma's garden when I was a child and alsways think of her when I see it:)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ted would like to thank everyone who defended his character, his insists that the chewing episode happened many years ago when he was a wee puppy and therefore not to blame.

    Thank you also "Over the garden wall" for the information about the song, I never made that connection before. I did a little research and found that the plant grew on bomb sites.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Naughty Ted for losing Billy...lol. I hope he didn't get eaten. We are trying to tidy up our garden too before the weeds take over entirely. They have practically surrounded my alliums already. Love the buttercups. So humble and very English.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I like the look of your garden and enlarged the image the image to better see the London Pride.

    Your beautiful buttercups reminded me of Faberge flowers and I searched my bookshelves for one in particular. Found it, and have made a link on my blog today.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Love the idea of using a chimney pot for a planter! London Pride is beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh, that brings back such happy childhood memories, we always grew London Pride when I was little, and oddly enough, I bought a small pot a couple of weeks ago at a charity plant sale, as I couldn't resist it!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Ground covers are such a life saver, aren't they? One thing I don't miss about having a garden is the weeding. My orchids are pretty low maintenance! I do miss the sunny afternoons in the garden, though. Enjoy all your spring cleaning!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I like the pale foxgloves getting ready to flower in the background.

    Adsense Alternative

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thanks for sharing your beautiful garden. It's all green and beautiful here in British Columbia, Canada, too. I have to wander out with my cup of tea every morning to inspect the greenery and smell the honeysuckle--so lovely.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I have a big plastic bin of Legos tucked away somewhere at the manor. Brings back sweet memories.

    ReplyDelete
  14. What a lovely garden vignette, I love the chimney pot. They are pretty scarce and difficult to find here in East Tennessee.

    ReplyDelete