6/22/2010

Japanese Kozo Paper



I have been patiently waiting for the arrival of suitable paper in order to print my wood engraving. I took advice from Chris Daunt who has been more than helpful with advice and supplies. If you are thinking of trying this craft I would suggest you visit his website first.

Chris advised Japanese White Kozo paper for hand burnishing. This method is an alternative to printing in a press. I was very surprised when my order came, the paper is very fine, like tissue paper and at first I thought I had ordered incorrectly. I have since learnt that Kozo is extremely strong and is nothing like our western pulp made paper. This Japanese paper is made with the fiber from the inside of the bark of the Mulberry tree. Its long, fine fibers give the paper strength, flexibility and smoothness, which are perfect for printing; it is also used in conservation and book repair. Its translucent quality also helps when burnishing as you can see the print through the paper so you have a better idea where to apply the pressure.

I found that the paper performed well and was a pleasure you use. I may try different papers in due course, the ladies at the paper suppliers were very helpful and have even promised me some free sample sheets to experiment on! For the time being I have decide to put some of the prints into my Etsy shop in the hope that I may be able to fund more materials and maybe a workshop or two!

22 comments:

  1. Wonderful. This is such distinctive artwork and your overview of the paper is most interesting. Mulberry pulp of all the woods....

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  2. Valerie, something sounds and looks familiar to me about that paper. I must have seen it in an art supply store, or known someone else who talked about its wonders.

    I don't think that I have ever used it myself...but maybe long ago I did.

    Your prints are beauties. I love hand burnishing.

    xo

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  3. All things Japanese are so lovely...the inside of the bark of a mulberry tree...just the thought is beautiful. Your prints are marvelous.

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  4. The print looks great... and I LOVE free samples. As an art prof. I get a lot of freebies, its more than helpful to figure out papers I want to use as it can be very expensive to pay for a bunch of paper and not like it, as I;m sure you know.

    May an abundance of sample paper flow to you!

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  5. Beautiful. I remember my printmaking teacher introducing us to mulberry fibre paper which is, as you say, fine to the point of translucence but also very strong.

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  6. Fascinating and beautiful. I love paper shops.

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  7. Your posts always make me want to hop in the car and get to the art supply store. These papers are so tempting!! Such lovely work you do.

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  8. Beautiful Valerie. Isn't it nice when you find a new material and it all works.

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  9. Valerie, this looks like a really fun and interesting material to use!
    Thanks for the heads up about it! I will be searching for this in my travels.

    Blessings,
    Diane

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  10. That burnishing shot is great! Really nice to see it emerging, and really good info on the paper too...
    Looks like a lovely engraving!

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  11. very interesting - do you think it would be good for lino printing also?

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  12. I am very intriged by the photograph as the print can be seen through the paper. Which is the printed right side, or is it a double sided print?
    I love Japanese paper for printing onto and have mainly used it for screen printing. Great to see your printig methods.

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  13. Clare, I think there is a different sort of burnisher for larger prints but I suppose the principle is the same.

    Jacqui, the photograph shows the wrong side, the inked block is underneath the paper and the print shows through because the paper is fine; like tissue paper. The wrong side, ie. the top side, shows the print but not as clearly as the right side.

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  14. Lovely prints - I love the beehive! I'm off to look at your shop:)

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  15. Ooooh, these are absolutely lovely! They fill my eyes. WOW!

    I'd never heard of this kind of paper before--thank you for the info.

    Your prints are just exquisite.

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  16. This is Fascinating and Beautiful! I love how it looks so tender even though it takes lots of muscles to create it. Very exciting.

    There is also a very strong teabag paper which I have bought from Jackie Cardy - let me know if you want info on it.

    I love your owl, too. :-)

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  17. This is fascinating Valerie! The burnishing process looks very rewarding. I am really enjoying your journey with this printing process. You make me want to give it a try.

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  18. exquisite paper..i can almost feel how delicate yet strong it is.

    your lino prints are gorgeous!!

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  19. My sweet Friend. My heart weeps with yours. Clytie and I lost our brother in 2002 to cancer.

    The grief will always be with you--but the pain becomes less sharp. Although sometimes the missing him floods back full force.

    ((hugs)) We prayed for him, too. God saw fit to answer differently that January morning.

    And I weep as I write those words.

    Dear one you are in my prayers.

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  20. how wonderful that you were given advice for a paper that would work for your project! Your art is so wonderful. Thank you for sharing this information.

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  21. Your results on that fine paper are exquisite Valerie. I think the Japanese have paper making off to a fine art (if you will excuse the pun...lol)

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